The biggest obstacle to creativity is attachment to outcome. As soon as you become attached to a specific outcome, you feel compelled to control and manipulate what you’re doing. And in the process you shut yourself off to other possibilities.

I got a call from someone who wanted me to lead a workshop on creativity. He needed to tell his management exactly what tools people would come away with. I told him I didn’t know. I couldn’t give him a promise, because then I’d become attached to an outcome — which would defeat the purpose of any creative workshop.’

It’s hard for corporations to understand that creativity is not just about succeeding. It’s about experimenting and discovering.

newsweek:

Catching a glimpse of the puppet masters who play with the data trails we leave online is always disorienting. And yet there’s something new-level creepy about a recent study that shows Facebook manipulated what users saw when they logged into the site as a way to study how it would affect their moods. But why? 

Psychologists do all kinds of mood research and behavior studies. What made this study, which quickly stirred outrage, feel so wrong? Even Susan Fiske, the professor of psychology at Princeton University who edited the study for Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of America, had doubts when the research first crossed her desk. “I was concerned,” she told me in a phone interview, “until I queried the authors and they said their local institutional review board had approved it—and apparently on the grounds that Facebook apparently manipulates people’s News Feeds all the time… I understand why people have concerns. I think their beef is with Facebook, really, not the research.” 

Even the Editor of Facebook’s Mood Study Thought It Was Creepy - Adrienne LaFrance - The Atlantic

newsweek:

Catching a glimpse of the puppet masters who play with the data trails we leave online is always disorienting. And yet there’s something new-level creepy about a recent study that shows Facebook manipulated what users saw when they logged into the site as a way to study how it would affect their moods. But why?

Psychologists do all kinds of mood research and behavior studies. What made this study, which quickly stirred outrage, feel so wrong? Even Susan Fiske, the professor of psychology at Princeton University who edited the study for Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of America, had doubts when the research first crossed her desk. “I was concerned,” she told me in a phone interview, “until I queried the authors and they said their local institutional review board had approved it—and apparently on the grounds that Facebook apparently manipulates people’s News Feeds all the time… I understand why people have concerns. I think their beef is with Facebook, really, not the research.”

Even the Editor of Facebook’s Mood Study Thought It Was Creepy - Adrienne LaFrance - The Atlantic


At fifteen you had the radiance of early morning, at twenty you will begin to have the melancholy brilliance of the moon.
F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise (via unculturedmag)


No-thing. A clear and free space to create and recreate who I am being in the moment. Every moment. Be-Do-Have

No-thing. A clear and free space to create and recreate who I am being in the moment. Every moment. Be-Do-Have

(via theextroverts)



swingbyswing:

Just the Tip: Chipping with a Hybrid

Here’s a tip from Swing by Swing pro, Brad Smith, on how to get out of the deep rough around the green using a hybrid.


swingbyswing:

Use the “Short Waggle” to Hit straighter Drives

A lot of golfers rotate without thinking about where their club is. Doing so could cause major hooks or slices.

Here is a short and simple tip to bring back the club on plane AS you start rotating back.


dailyharts:

JUST A REMINDER THAT THE HAIR ON YOUR LEG IS A FORM OF PROTEcTION. SO IF ANYONE EVER COMMENTS ON IT JUST TELL THEM “ITS MEANT TO PROTECT ME FROM STUPID PEOPLE BUT APPARENTLY ITS NOT WORKING.”